Opal (polished) from Jalisco, Mexico [OPAL3]
Opal (polished)
Jalisco, Mexico
Spinel (rough and cut) from Mogok, Sagaing District, Mandalay Division, Burma (Myanmar) [SPINEL4]
Spinel (rough and cut)
Mogok, Sagaing District, Mandalay Division, Burma (Myanmar)
Opal var. Hyalite from San Luis Potosi, Mexico [OPAL14]
Opal var. Hyalite
San Luis Potosi, Mexico
Beryl var. Aquamarine (etched) from Itatia Mine, Minas Gerais, Brazil [AQUA8]
Beryl var. Aquamarine (etched)
Itatia Mine, Minas Gerais, Brazil
Apophyllite with Scolecite from Jalisgoan, near Jalgoan, Maharashtra State, India [APOPHYLLITE5]
Apophyllite with Scolecite
Jalisgoan, near Jalgoan, Maharashtra State, India
Quartz, var. Herkimer Diamond from Ace of Diamonds Mine, Herkimer County,  New York [HERKIMER6]
Quartz, var. Herkimer Diamond
Ace of Diamonds Mine, Herkimer County, New York

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Mixed Worldwide Minerals



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(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Quartz with 4-phase petroleum inclusions from Zhob Baluchistan, Pakistan [db_pics/pics/quartz41a.jpg] Quartz with 4-phase petroleum inclusions from Zhob Baluchistan, Pakistan [db_pics/pics/quartz41b.jpg] Quartz with 4-phase petroleum inclusions from Zhob Baluchistan, Pakistan [db_pics/pics/quartz41c.jpg]



QUARTZ41 - Quartz with 4-phase petroleum inclusions
$ 115.00 (=~ AUS$ 151.80)
SOLD
Zhob Baluchistan, Pakistan
thumbnail - 2.7 x 2.6 x 2.3 cm

This is a good example of this uncommon form of Quartz. It is a four phase inclusion in a double terminated Quartz crystal found in central Pakistan within the last year. It is highly fluorescent under both short wave and long wave (LW pictured). The long wave makes the petroleum fluoresce yellow, the short wave brings out the more reds and blues.  There is one prominent moving bubble in the center of the crystal that moves freely. The gas bubble formed when the the Quartz cools after forming, the petroleum contracts more than the Quartz because it is less dense, it pulls a vacume within the fluid thus creating a "gas" bubble.  The four phases are: the gas bubble trapped in the petroleum, the petroleum itself, a darker brown previously organic material, and black carbon inclusions. I learned this from an insightful geologist who specializes in Quartz inclusions, whom I met at the Tucson Main show in 2010. This one is a tabulr crystal that is single terminated, although it is not broken (the bottom is rehealed). It has a very tiny chip or two along one edge, overall in good condition, this piece is a "cathedral-like" quartz, with multiple terminations. Also a good example of the brown (ex-organic) inclusion next to the pastel yellow petroleum inclusion. It weighs 15 grams.




(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Quartz with 4-phase petroleum inclusions from Zhob Baluchistan, Pakistan [db_pics/pics/quartz40a.jpg] Quartz with 4-phase petroleum inclusions from Zhob Baluchistan, Pakistan [db_pics/pics/quartz40b.jpg] Quartz with 4-phase petroleum inclusions from Zhob Baluchistan, Pakistan [db_pics/pics/quartz40d.jpg]



QUARTZ40 - Quartz with 4-phase petroleum inclusions
$ 95.00 (=~ AUS$ 125.40)
SOLD
Zhob Baluchistan, Pakistan
thumbnail - 3.0 x 2.7 x 1.5 cm

This is a fine example of this uncommon form of Quartz. It is a four phase inclusion in a double terminated Quartz crystal found in central Pakistan within the last year. It is highly fluorescent under both short wave and long wave (LW pictured). The long wave makes the petroleum fluoresce yellow, the short wave brings out the more reds and blues.  There is one prominent moving bubble in the center of the crystal that moves freely. The gas bubble formed when the the Quartz cools after forming, the petroleum contracts more than the Quartz because it is less dense, it pulls a vacume within the fluid thus creating a "gas" bubble.  The four phases are: the gas bubble trapped in the petroleum, the petroleum itself, a darker brown previously organic material, and black carbon inclusions. I learned this from an insightful geologist who specializes in Quartz inclusions, whom I met at the Tucson Main show in 2010. This one is a tabulr crystal that is single terminated, although it is not broken (the bottom is rehealed). It has a little chipping along an edge, Overall in good condition, this piece is a great example of the brown (ex-organic) inclusion next to the pastel yellow petroleum inclusion. It weighs 13 grams.




(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Quartz with 4-phase petroleum inclusions from Zhob Baluchistan, Pakistan [db_pics/pics/quartz39a.jpg] Quartz with 4-phase petroleum inclusions from Zhob Baluchistan, Pakistan [db_pics/pics/quartz39b.jpg] Quartz with 4-phase petroleum inclusions from Zhob Baluchistan, Pakistan [db_pics/pics/quartz39c.jpg] Quartz with 4-phase petroleum inclusions from Zhob Baluchistan, Pakistan [db_pics/pics/quartz39d.jpg] Quartz with 4-phase petroleum inclusions from Zhob Baluchistan, Pakistan [db_pics/pics/quartz39e.jpg]



QUARTZ39 - Quartz with 4-phase petroleum inclusions
$ 175.00 (=~ AUS$ 231.00)
SOLD
Zhob Baluchistan, Pakistan
thumbnail - 4.8 x 2.8 x 1.7 cm

This is a vary Large example of this uncommon form of Quartz (the largest one I have ever seen). It is a four phase inclusion in a double terminated Quartz crystal found in central Pakistan within the last year. It is highly fluorescent under both short wave and long wave (LW pictured). The long wave makes the petroleum fluoresce yellow, the short wave brings out the more reds and blues.  There are a couple bubbles, with one prominent one in the center of the crystal that freely moves. The gas bubble formed when the the Quartz cools after forming, the petroleum contracts more than the Quartz because it is less dense, it pulls a vacume within the fluid thus creating a "gas" bubble.  The four phases are: the gas bubble trapped in the petroleum, the petroleum itself, a darker brown previously organic material, and black carbon inclusions. I learned this from an insightful geologist who specializes in Quartz inclusions, whom I met at the Tucson Main show in 2010. It has a little scuffing or contact on onevertical face. Overall in good condition, especially for such a large example.




(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Quartz Var. Rose from Galiléia, Doce valley, Minas Gerais, Brazil [db_pics/pics/quartz38a.jpg] Quartz Var. Rose from Galiléia, Doce valley, Minas Gerais, Brazil [db_pics/pics/quartz38b.jpg]



QUARTZ38 - Quartz Var. Rose
$ 149.00 (=~ AUS$ 196.68)
SOLD
Galiléia, Doce valley, Minas Gerais, Brazil
miniature - 3.6 x 2.7 x 1.3 cm

I spent several hours pouring through a recently found pocket of over 10,000 rose quartz specimens fresh from the mine in Brazil. This was one of the best from the pocket. It has a distinct pink color, with a bright sheen and significant transparency. It has no damage at all not even on the back or base. I can mount this on an acrylic base for anyone who buys it (just ask). It weighs 12.5 grams.




(click on the pictures to enlarge)

Quartz Var. Amethyst Scepters from Goboboseb Mtns. Brandberg Dist. Erongo Region, Namibia [db_pics/pics/quartz37a.jpg] Quartz Var. Amethyst Scepters from Goboboseb Mtns. Brandberg Dist. Erongo Region, Namibia [db_pics/pics/quartz37b.jpg] Quartz Var. Amethyst Scepters from Goboboseb Mtns. Brandberg Dist. Erongo Region, Namibia [db_pics/pics/quartz37c.jpg] Quartz Var. Amethyst Scepters from Goboboseb Mtns. Brandberg Dist. Erongo Region, Namibia [db_pics/pics/quartz37d.jpg]



QUARTZ37 - Quartz Var. Amethyst Scepters
$ 475.00 (=~ AUS$ 627.00)
SOLD
Goboboseb Mtns. Brandberg Dist. Erongo Region, Namibia
small cabinet - 7 x 4.6 x 3.3 cm

This unusual example of "antenna Quartz," occurred as a brief layer in  a Quartz vein in the Goboboseb mountains in Namibia. The vein was frosty white quartz, and then they hit a layer where there were secondary growth of Amethyst on the white quartz crystals. Some of the secondary growth may be considered "reverse sceptering," as the Quartz grows skinnier and more narrow, compared with the opposite being "scepters," where they expand outward. 

This piece was the best from a lot I purchased of the Charlie Key collection. What makes this the best example is its broad array of crystallization on a single piece. There are clear quartz crystals that turn purple but have no obvious shift in structure, then there are ones that scepter as they turn purple, and others that become narrower as they turn purple. No damage. 



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